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French find recipe for success

France has added a winning tradition to its long history at the vanguard of the world game.
French find recipe for success
France celebrate winning UEFA EURO 2000 ©Getty Images

French find recipe for success

France has added a winning tradition to its long history at the vanguard of the world game.

Although football made its debut in France in 1872 with the founding of the Havre Athletic Club, the first proper competition took place as late as 1894, organised by the Union des Sociétés Françaises de Sports Athlétiques.

In the early years of the 20th century several multi-sport federations shared the task of arranging football events. However, it was not until 1904 – after FIFA had been established in Paris – that a French national team first took to the field for a 3-3 draw against Belgium.

In 1906 the Comité Français Interfédéral (CFI) became the first body devoted exclusively to football. The CFI oversaw a Trophée de France which brought together the football champions of the various multi-sport federations. A further milestone was reached in 1917 as the Coupe de France, now the country's longest-running soccer tournament, was launched to herald a new era. The Fédération Française de Football Association (FFFA) was formed two years later.

The game grew quickly thereafter. In 1930 a France team took part in the first edition of the FIFA World Cup – an event that owed its existence to the efforts of Frenchmen Jules Rimet and Henri Delaunay. Professionalism was introduced in 1932. France was again in the vanguard in 1954 when it came to creating UEFA and its flagship competitions – the European Champion Clubs' Cup (1955/56) and the UEFA European Championship/Henri Delaunay Cup (1958–60). At the World Cup in 1958, Les Bleus took a very respectable third place as Just Fontaine top-scored with 13 goals, still a finals record.

Where the league championship and the French Cup drew ever-increasing crowds, the national team failed to catch the eye after those exploits in Sweden. However, the side's eventual renaissance, under the direction of star player Michel Platini in the early 1980s, was well worth the wait. The breakthrough came in 1984 with France's first international title – the UEFA European Championship. That success was prefaced by a fourth-place finish at the 1982 World Cup and confirmed by third place in Mexico in 1986. These achievements also inspired the nation's clubs: Olympique de Marseille won the UEFA Champions League in 1993, before Paris Saint-Germain FC lifted the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup three years later.

In 1998, 60 years after hosting the third edition of the World Cup, France again organised the global game's flagship event. Coached by Aimé Jacquet, Les Bleus were well prepared for this historic opportunity and carried off the country's maiden world title, beating Brazil 3-0 in the final with the help of two headed goals from talisman Zinédine Zidane. Then in 2000, under Roger Lemerre, France claimed a second European crown, before adding the FIFA Confederations Cup to the honours list in both 2001 and 2003.

The 2002 World Cup brought disappointment as the holders were eliminated in the group stage. However, the team bounced back under Jacques Santini with a dominant performance in UEFA EURO 2004 qualifying, before going out to ultimate victors Greece in the quarter-finals. Raymond Domenech subsequently took command and France produced a fine 2006 World Cup campaign, culminating in a penalty shoot-out defeat by Italy in the final. If their UEFA EURO 2008 and 2010 World Cup challenges both proved short-lived, Les Bleus managed to reach the quarter-finals of UEFA EURO 2012, where they were undone by eventual winners Spain.

http://www.uefa.com/member-associations/association=fra/news/newsid=945183.html#french+find+recipe+success

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President

 

Noël Le Graët

Noël Le Graët

Nationality: French
Date of Birth: 25 December 1941
Association president since: 2011

• A former tax office civil servant, Noël Le Graët entered political life as mayor of Guingamp, a town in Brittany, in 1995 (until 2008). He headed up the town's football local club, the En Avant de Guigamp, from 1972 to 1991, then from 2002 to 2011, stepping down when elected FFF President in 2011. He is also a renowned businessman in the food industry.

• Le Graët came through the ranks of the former Professional Football League (LFP), the then National Football League (LNF), entering its Executive Board in 1984, and becoming president in 1991 – a post he held for nine years. During this period, he created the DNCG, a national directorate responsible for controlling the financial health of French clubs.

• A vice-president in charge of economic affairs at the FFF since 2002, Le Graët was elected as president by the FFF assembly on 18 June 2011, and spoke of "a great feeling", as well as acknowledging "the huge task ahead" and emphasising "a will to work together as soon as possible". He was re-elected for a second four-year term in December 2012.

General secretary

 

Florence Hardouin

Florence Hardouin

Nationality: French
Date of birth: 26 January 1967
Association chief executive since: 2013

• A former fencing champion who spent ten years in the France team, winning the epee team World Cup silver medal in 1991, Florence Hardouin also worked in marketing for some of the biggest French companies: Bouygues, Canal+ and SFR.

• She joined the France Football Federation (FFF) in 2008 to launch their internal marketing operation. Her success led to her taking a delegated chief executive position and becoming a head of administration.

• Hardouin became FFF general secretary in February 2013, .

Association info

  • Founded: 1919
  • UEFA affiliation: 1954
  • FIFA affiliation: 1904
  • Address: 87, boulevard de Grenelle 75738 PARIS Cedex 15
  • Telephone: +33 1 4431 7300
  • Fax: +33 1 4431 7373

UEFA ranking

CountryClubsPts
4ItalyItaly0/666.938
5PortugalPortugal1/662.299
6FranceFrance0/656.500
7RussiaRussia0/646.998
8NetherlandsNetherlands0/644.312
Last updated: 26/05/2014 06:59 CET

Honours by National Teams

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